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dc.contributor.advisorKamiar Kouzekanani
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-01T00:50:58Z
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-01T00:50:58Z2013-03-01T00:50:58Z
dc.date.available2013-03-01T00:50:58Z
dc.date.available2013-03-01T00:50:58Z2013-03-01T00:50:58Z
dc.date.issued2/28/2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/416
dc.description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership."en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study tested the hypothesis that self-efficacy, stress, and acculturation are useful predictors of academic achievement in first year university science, independent of high school GPA and SAT scores, in a sample of Latino students at a South Texas Hispanic serving institution of higher education. The correlational study employed a mixed methods explanatory sequential model. The non-probability sample consisted of 98 university science and engineering students. The study participants had high science self-efficacy, low number of stressors, and were slightly Anglo-oriented bicultural to strongly Anglo-oriented. As expected, the control variables of SAT score and high school GPA were statistically significant predictors of the outcome measures. Together, they accounted for 19.80% of the variation in first year GPA, 13.80% of the variation in earned credit hours, and 11.30% of the variation in intent to remain in the science major. After controlling for SAT scores and high school GPAs, self-efficacy was a statistically significant predictor of credit hours earned and accounted for 5.60% of the variation; its unique contribution in explaining the variation in first year GPA and intent to remain in the science major was not statistically significant. Stress and acculturation were not statistically significant predictors of any of the outcome measures. Analysis of the qualitative data resulted in six themes (a) high science self-efficacy, (b) stressors, (c) positive role of stress, (d) Anglo-oriented, (e) bicultural, and (f) family. The quantitative and qualitative results were synthesized and practical implications were discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with its source. All rights are reserved and retained regardless of current or future development or laws that may apply to fair use standards. Permission for publication of this material, in part or in full, must be secured with the author and/or publisher.en_US
dc.subjectAcculturationen_US
dc.subjectLatinosen_US
dc.subjectPredictorsen_US
dc.subjectScienceen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
dc.titleSelf-efficacy, stress, and acculturation as predictors of first year science success among Latinos at a South Texas universityen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A & M University--Corpus Christien_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
dc.description.departmentEducational Leadership, Curriculum & Instructionen_US
dc.description.collegeCollege of Education and Human Developmenten_US
dc.type.genreDissertationen_US


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