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dc.contributor.authorNJAGI, NYAMBURA GACHETTE
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-23T20:00:15Z
dc.date.available2014-06-23T20:00:15Z
dc.date.issued6/23/2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/551
dc.descriptionA THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCEen_US
dc.description.abstractObesity is a growing health concern in Nueces County. In fact, three years ago the county seat of Nueces County, Corpus Christi, was reported as the “Fattest City in America” by Men’s Health magazine (Colleti and Masters, 2010) – an alarming fact but one that mirrors a national trend. According to at least one statistic, 46% of the U.S. population will be obese by 2018 (Swaney, 2012). The rate and magnitude of the problem is so great that many researchers believe that individual risk factors alone, such as genetics, cannot account for the trend. Factors associated with the areas in which we live and work, including spatial accessibility to physical activity sites, may have a greater impact on obesogenic behavior such as failing to consistently engage in adequate physical activity. Consequently, neighborhood-level analyses (such as zip code-level or census tract-level) are becoming more prevalent in the health science literature in order to better understand how neighborhood environmental factors mediate obesity. Neighborhoods with better spatial accessibility to physical activity sites are thought to increase physical activity. While it is clear that lack of physical activity is a major contributing factor to obesity and overweight there is little local information about environmental factors that influence obesity in Nueces County. In this study, each census tract was considered as an individual neighborhood and neighborhood spatial accessibility to physical activity sites was measured using network analysis. A total of 338 physical activity sites in 82 neighborhoods were analyzed. Populations that live inside the Corpus Christi urban area have greater accessibility to every type of physical activity examined including parks, fitness sites, golf courses, youth and senior recreation centers as well as physical sports and fun sites.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with its source. All rights are reserved and retained regardless of current or future development or laws that may apply to fair use standards. Permission for publication of this material, in part or in full, must be secured with the author and/or publisher.en_US
dc.subjectSpatial accessibilityen_US
dc.subjectobesityen_US
dc.subjectCorpus Christien_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.subjectphysical activity environmenten_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.titleDRIVING FACTORS OF OBESITY IN SOUTH TEXAS: EXPLORING SPATIAL ACCESS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ENVIRONMENT IN NUECES COUNTY, TEXASen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeospatial Surveying Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A & M University--Corpus Christien_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.description.departmentComputing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.collegeCollege of Science and Engineeringen_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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