This course includes 13 chapters that include web pages, images and videos. These materials can be incorporated into any courses at different granularity levels such as a whole chapter, an image, and a video clip.

The course lecture videos were created by Dr. Rudolph (Rudy) Rosen at Texas A&M International University in San Antonio and funded by NSF Research Coordination Network - CE3SAR. Reusing the materials for educational propose is free with crediting to RCN CE3SAR project and Dr. Rosen. Credits, Thanks and Project Overview. Repurposing the materials needs permission of Rudolph Rosen. Contact email: education@tpwd.texas.gov

Recent Submissions

  • Chapter 4: Living in Water 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    All aquatic species, including fish and other aquatic animals, are uniquely adapted to life in or around water.
  • Chapter 6: Texas Aquatic Ecosystems 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    Ecosystems are complex interdependent webs of relationships between living and nonliving things. Texas has six kinds of aquatic ecosystem supporting significant biodiversity.
  • Chapter 7: Aquifers and Springs 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    Springs have attracted humans to settle nearby where water is abundant, but careful use is necessary to balance the recharge of aquifers with the use by people. Aquifers and springs also provide aquatic habitats where ...
  • Chapter 9: Lakes and Ponds 

    Rosen, Rudolph (2016-01)
    Lakes and ponds provide habitat for many plants, insects, fish, birds and other wildlife, much of our drinking water and important economic and recreational opportunities for Texans.
  • Chapter 2: Water: The Ultimate Recyclable 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    The earth’s water is one, finite supply that moves from streams to lakes to oceans, flowing underground, freezing on mountaintops and forming the clouds we see in the sky. All this moving and shifting around of water is ...
  • Chapter 12: Oceans: The Gulf of Mexico 

    Rosen, Rudolph (2016-01)
    The Gulf of Mexico is one of the most productive waters in the world, and it is among the most threatened by human actions and neglect.
  • Chapter 5: From Sun to Sunfish 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    Aquatic habitats are communities in which complex interactions take place among populations and individual organisms as they compete for limited resources in an interdependent web of relationships.
  • Chapter 13: Water for People and the Environment 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    ne of the greatest challenges facing Texas is balancing the water needs of people with the needs of our environment. We are all connected by water, and how much usable water we have for the future will depend on what we ...
  • Chapter 8: Streams and Rivers 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    Texas streams and rivers support diverse ecosystems that are dependent upon the size and flow of water. The healthiest streams and rivers are those with the least altered natural processes.
  • Chapter 11: Bays and Estuaries 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    Texas bays and estuaries provide vital ecosystems and nursery habitat for many important Gulf species, feeding and resting places for migrating birds, and billions of dollars to the Texas economy.
  • Chapter 10: Wetlands 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    Wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, and home to many specially adapted plant and wildlife species. Wetlands provide many important benefits to people, fish, and wildlife.
  • Chapter 3: What’s Your Watershed Address? 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    Everyone lives in a watershed. Everything that happens on the land affects the water in that watershed.
  • Chapter 1: Water is Life 

    Rosen, Rudolph (RCN CE3SAR project, 2016-01)
    Water has properties that make it essential to life. And although the earth is known as “the water planet,” it has limited quantities of available freshwater.