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dc.contributor.advisorKouzekanani, Kamiar
dc.contributor.authorDel Bosque, Sylvia Eulalia
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-19T22:21:06Z
dc.date.available2018-12-19T22:21:06Z
dc.date.issued2018-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/87105
dc.description.abstractLeadership in the 21st century continues to be an ongoing concern and challenge for leaders and followers alike. According to the Servant Leadership Theory (SLT), individuals with a natural desire to serve have the potential to become servant leaders, lead unselfishly, and demonstrate leadership through authenticity, humility and trustworthiness that focuses on the one-on-one relations with the follower (Greenleaf, 1977). The following research questions guided the study: (1) What are the servant leadership behaviors of GED graduates? (2) To what extent are the servant leadership behaviors of GED graduates affected by their selected demographic characteristics? The study took place in South Texas. The GED participants (n = 75) were scholarship recipients of the Education is Our Freedom GED College Scholarship Program (EIOF). A 2-part survey instrument, the Servant Leadership Questionnaire (SLQ), was developed by the researcher. The first part was designed to measure the servant leadership behaviors, utilizing a previously published instrument. The second part was designed to collect the selected demographic characteristics of the respondents. A web-based version of the SLQ was used for the purpose of data collection, utilizing Qualtrics survey software. A series of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques were used to analyze and report the data. Due to non-experimental nature of the study, no causal inferences were drawn. The respondents were predominantly Hispanic and female, likely to be attending a 4-year university full-time and employed part-time. A typical participant was 27 years old. Analysis of the data showed that the study participants demonstrated agreement with serval leadership behaviors. Specifically, Conceptual Skills and Emotional Healing were ranked the highest, followed by Behaving Ethically, Creating Value, Helping Others Grow, Empowering Others, and Putting Others First. The behaviors were not impacted by the overwhelming majority of the respondents’ selected demographic variables that were investigated in the study. The three exceptions were age in association with Helping Others and years of attending college’s associations with Empowering Behaviors and Putting Others First. The study’s findings are helpful in offering practical implications. For example, servant leadership training sessions can be developed for GED graduates to add to their leadership skills. Through practice of servant leadership behaviors, GED graduates may contribute to the society by giving of their time, energy, and resources to serve others. Practicing servant leadership may facilitate higher education, afford leadership opportunities within school and community, and ultimately provide a better quality of life. The GED graduates who exhibit and maintain leadership skills through authenticity, trustworthiness, and humility may likely to become exemplary servant leaders.en_US
dc.format.extent82 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with its source. All rights are reserved and retained regardless of current or future development or laws that may apply to fair use standards. Permission for publication of this material, in part or in full, must be secured with the author and/or publisher.en_US
dc.subjectGEDen_US
dc.subjectGED Graduatesen_US
dc.subjectServant Leaderen_US
dc.subjectServant Leadership Theoryen_US
dc.subjectServant Teacheren_US
dc.subjectServant Teachingen_US
dc.titleServant leadership behaviors of general equivalency diploma (GED) graduates: a non-randomized exploratory inquiryen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A & M University--Corpus Christien_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLucido, Frank
dc.contributor.committeeMemberElliff, D. Scott
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEtheridge, Charles
dcterms.typeText
dc.description.departmentEducational Leadership, Curriculum & Instructionen_US
dc.description.collegeCollege of Education and Human Developmenten_US
dc.type.genreDissertationen_US


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