Understanding nanoplastic particle accumulation and cell response in human skin cells

Date

2023-08

Authors

Simpson, Kayla Haylie

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Abstract

Environmental nanoplastic particles (NPs) are considered hazardous materials that can potentially enter human bodies through various entry pathways due to their sizes (<1µm). Studies over the past few years have produced results showing the capability of nanoplastic particles (NPs) to enter cells. However, the mechanism of NP cellular uptake remains unclear. Furthermore, the internalization and accumulation of NPs by human cells can likely be altered by the various characteristics of NPs, including materials, shapes, and surface properties. This study aimed to understand the mechanisms of NPs internalization and accumulation in skin cells, including keratinocytes, dermal fibroblast cells, and adipocytes, and how those processes can be altered by the surface coating components (surface corona). The study was conducted using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to track NP endocytosis, organelle staining to determine intracellular co-localization patterns, and various assays and genetic analyses to understand how NPs affect cell functions and inflammation. The results of the present study demonstrated different internalization mechanisms of NPs depending on cell type, exposure time, particle size, and surface composition. It was also observed that specific vital organelles were more likely to co-localize with NPs, depending on particle size and exposure time. NP accumulation patterns in skin cells revealed potential mechanisms behind the impaired cellular function of cells exposed to NPs. Therefore, potential risks were determined to be associated with the exposure of human skin cells to NPs.

Description

A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Marine Biology

Keywords

fibroblasts, kertinocytes, nanoplastic particles, pre-adipocytes, protein coronas

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