Don't blame the siblings! Social experiences of gender nonconformity: Does a higher proportion of brothers and negative feedback affect masculinity among sexual minority men?

Date

2023-05

Authors

Cowan, Alisha

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Abstract

Social role theory (Eagly et al. 2004; Eagly, 1987) suggests that individuals who strongly conform to traditional gender roles uphold the hierarchy of the hegemonic male--a model of power, status, and strength—to reap the social benefits of inclusion. Inversely, violations of these roles can cause multiple negative effects of being socially outcasted, being a victim of physical violence, and suicidal ideations (Fiske et al. 2002; Vaughn et al. 2017). Therefore, such experiences lead to a heightened salience of masculine consciousness—consistent presentation of masculinity—for greater social approval (Taywaditep, 2002; 2001). This study aims to explore the relationship between a gay man’s experiences with their sibling’s social feedback about their gender nonconforming behavior and a gay man’s subsequent levels of masculinity. Results of the study failed to provide evidence that sibling composition and negative feedback by siblings affected a gay man’s level of hegemonic masculinity or masculine consciousness. Keywords: Social Roles, Gender Roles, Hegemonic Masculinity, Sexual Minority, Siblings

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A Thesis Submitted In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF ARTS in CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Department of Psychology from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi.

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brother, experienced rejection, hegemonic masculinity, masculine consciousness, sexual minority, sister

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