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dc.contributor.advisorDaniel Pearce
dc.contributor.advisorEvan T. Ortlieb
dc.contributor.authorPate, Roberta Simnacher
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-06T23:10:15Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-06T23:10:15Z2012-08-06T23:10:15Z
dc.date.available2012-08-06T23:10:15Z
dc.date.available2012-08-06T23:10:15Z2012-08-06T23:10:15Z
dc.date.issued8/6/2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/288
dc.descriptionA dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instructionen_US
dc.description.abstractTexas rural schools, educating more than half a million students annually, and rural schools across the nation have been under scrutiny for the inability to provide quality education through course offerings, facilities, and qualified teachers. To address this issue, the investigator utilized Spradley’s (1980) seminal work, Participant Observation, as a guide to examine two third-grade and two fourth-grade effective teachers within two high-performing, high-needs rural South Texas elementary campuses. Data collection included interviews of principals and teachers as well as classroom observations focused on classroom management, instructional approach/style, reading/writing instruction, and assessment over a five-week period during reading and writing class instruction. The application of Spradley’s 12-step method, Developmental Research Sequence, revealed that effective rural reading/writing teachers used motivational techniques, scaffolded and extended lessons beyond the scripted curriculum prompting critical thinking skills, authentic reading/writing literature and experiences to promote student success, and data analysis and self-reflection to meet the diverse needs of their students while maintaining the place of community. Implications from the study are relevant to administrators, educators, and community members, as these successful rural schools with vested and effective teachers are models of how rural education can meet and exceed the needs of its students.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with its source. All rights are reserved and retained regardless of current or future development or laws that may apply to fair use standards. Permission for publication of this material, in part or in full, must be secured with the author and/or publisher.en_US
dc.subjectelementaryen_US
dc.subjecthigh-needsen_US
dc.subjecthigh-performingen_US
dc.subjectruralen_US
dc.subjectschoolsen_US
dc.subjectteacheren_US
dc.titlePerspectives and practices of successful teachers in diverse rural South Texas high-performing high-needs elementary schoolsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum & Instructionen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A & M University--Corpus Christien_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.description.departmentEducational Leadership, Curriculum & Instructionen_US
dc.description.collegeCollege of Education and Human Developmenten_US
dc.type.genreDissertationen_US


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